November 13, 2007

Lunchtime Pondering

Over my roast beef sandwich (yum!), I'm browsing some of my blogs for news on the USCCB conference.

Father Zuhlsdorf has an intriguing post up. Unfortunately, his comments forum is closed! So, here I go...

Anyone can report on anything. Most of us can string a sentence together. I can string several together without drawing a breath (just watch, I do it constantly!)

Should reporters on Catholicism be Catholics? Not only Catholics but PRACTICING Catholics? Can someone really report the full story without living it?

Perhaps, it's possible to scratch the surface but you cannot even begin to grasp the depths of the Mystery without understanding some of the Clues.

I don't think that any of us who practice the Faith claim to be experts. I'm the first one to admit I'm not. But, I try and I KNOW what I need to be doing. Furthermore, I accept my flaws and I know they require work to be fully Christian. I know what I want to/need to understand-even if I'm not, or don't think, I'm there yet.

As I know there are few reporters on the Catholic beat who are Catholics, or practicing, this is why I think the truly Catholic blogs and their commenters are so important to me. At least, in this forum, we can get information and perspectives from people who GET IT.

Is "getting it" what makes John Allen so good? I have very little respect for the newspaper he writes for but I think he's brilliant. I don't know. I'm just having lunch and pondering.

13 Comments:

Blogger Ray from MN said...

Life's a Conundrum, and then you die and hopefully at least get to Purgatory.

We all, especially me, love to have things presented to us simply.

We forget that Our Lord and Savior gave us Free Will and a Brain and expected us to use them.

Therefore, we should be reading the National Catholic Reporter, and The Wanderer and The Remnant (and those papers in between like the Catholic Spirit and the NC Register) and the Pastor's "Two Cents Worth" from St Joan of Arc and Father Welzbacher of St John of St Paul and of course Stella Borealis, to become well informed Catholics.

We should also be reading the "Wild Reed" and "On Guard Against the Lunatic Fringe" to see what they're up to also. To round off your morning, I'd highly recommend the Angel Queen Forum for the official RadTrad take on things.

In between this schedule, to soothe the burns, occasional perusal of the Ironic Catholic, the Curt Jester and some of the Traddy sites like New Liturgical Movement, Rorate Caeli, The Lion and the Cardinal, The Roving Medievalist, etc. provide a meditative balm for the soul.

By my calculation, your daily reading time shouldn't take more than nine or ten hours to consider yourself to be a well-informed Catholic. Not necessarily a good one, though. You have to pray and go to church for that.

November 13, 2007 1:47 PM  
Blogger Fr. Andrew said...

But after you are done reading, Ray, you must act. James 2:19. I think that is the point of Fr. Z as well as Cardinal George in the episode related. As you said, you might be informed, but probably not good.

November 13, 2007 4:25 PM  
Blogger Terry Nelson said...

Blogging is conversation - discussing and sharing information - it is also action - people speaking up and being heard - in many cases, writing a blog is "acting" - James 2:19. And it may be the only honest voice in media.

November 13, 2007 7:18 PM  
Blogger Cathy_of_Alex said...

Good points, all.

Ray, I don't have that much roast beef to do all that reading. Good grief, what can I do?.

November 13, 2007 7:46 PM  
Blogger Sanctus Belle said...

Kathy said:

"Can someone really report the full story without living it? {the Catholic faith}"

I don't think so. That goes equally for those who TEACH the faith! You can't TEACH it effectively unless you BELIEVE it. If you believe it you must LIVE it, which makes it easier to TEACH it? Is that right?? :)

November 14, 2007 12:19 PM  
Blogger Cathy_of_Alex said...

Sanctus Belle: I agree.

November 14, 2007 5:59 PM  
Blogger Ray from MN said...

Fr. Andrew: "But after you are done reading, Ray, you must act. James 2:19."

Fortunately, Father, a few years ago I bought some tabs for my Jerusalem Bible so that now I can easily find Bible quotes in those places where I formerly feared to tread.

Thou believest that there is one God; thou doest well: the devils also believe, and tremble.
But wilt thou know, O vain man, that faith without works is dead?


Yup, I buy that! I can remember as a 12 year old with my Lutheran playmates debating the "faith and works" arguments. But I don't they ever covered James in Sunday School" in those days.

November 14, 2007 7:44 PM  
Blogger Ray from MN said...

Cathy: "Ray, I don't have that much roast beef to do all that reading. Good grief, what can I do?."

Cathy, haven't you ever heard of Cliff's Notes?

November 14, 2007 7:46 PM  
Blogger Vincenzo said...

"Fortunately, Father, a few years ago I bought some tabs for my Jerusalem Bible so that now I can easily find Bible quotes in those places where I formerly feared to tread."

Ray,

I just saw another version of the Jerusalem Bible recently that has been published by the Catholic Truth Society:

The CTS New Catholic Bible

I've been thinking about getting this or the Confraternity-Douay.

Vincenzo

November 14, 2007 8:40 PM  
Blogger Ray from MN said...

Vincenzo

Thanks for the heads up on the CTS Bible.

But I would like to start by saying that if I was planning on becoming a mass murderer, I would start with the people at Adobe who are in charge of the Acrobat software. They have a good idea, and it is a royal pain in the butt. I have never seen a program that is so at the mercy of the people who use it.

Most parishes around here use Acrobat to publish their bulletins on the Internet.

Most are impossible to load and read.

And that is true for many other users of Acrobat.

There is one parish, however, and I have talked to the webmaster about this, St Olaf's in Minneapolis that has a a bulletin in Acrobat that loads fast and reads and copies quickly. That guy could make millions off of the morons at other parishes and websites that think Acrobat is a good program if they would just pay him to teach them how to really use it.

Here's the website: saintolaf.org/bulletin.htm

And the guy is so humble that he is smart enough to publish in both Acrobat and in HTML.

To make a long story short, I can't read all the pages in the CTS pdf file on their new Bible that looks really interesting.

Ray

November 14, 2007 9:15 PM  
Blogger Ray from MN said...

Vincenzo:

I should mention that my Jerusalem Bible was purchased by me in London in 1967 or so and is copyrighted as a first edition by Darton, Longman & Todd.

Imprimatur by John Cardinal Heenan, Westminster, and Nihil Obstat by Lionel Swain.

The pages are sound but the binding is shot. I think rather than purchasing a new bible, as nice as the CTS offer looks, and at a reasonable price, I think I might have my old one rebound, maybe with a slip cover, too.

But I'd probably want to make notes as to the pages where I have scads of holy cards laid in. That way, when I got the rebound book back, I could "re-baptize" it by replacing the old holy cards and notes in their "proper" location.

I bought it when I was on Army leave (holiday?) during my pagan days when I was stationed in Germany in the U.S. Army defending the free world from beer.

November 14, 2007 9:28 PM  
Blogger Vincenzo said...

"But I would like to start by saying that if I was planning on becoming a mass murderer, I would start with the people at Adobe who are in charge of the Acrobat software. They have a good idea, and it is a royal pain in the butt. I have never seen a program that is so at the mercy of the people who use it."

I agree. That file at the CTS crashed my Firefox twice. It worked better after upgrading to Adobe Reader 8 and when using MSIE.

I'll paste some of the text here. The pages are split up so it's hard to copy most of it:

What’s New in the New Catholic Bible

Alongside the Jerusalem and
Grail translations authorised
by the Vatican for use in the
Liturgy:

 New specially
commissioned
introductions, one for
each book, giving the
biblical and historical
context

 New specially commissioned liturgical introductions placing each book of the Bible in the
Church’s liturgical year

 New footnotes following
the latest scholarship

 New marginal references
helping you get the most
out of each passage.

New layout – using clear
and modern fonts in
easy-to-read single-column
format

 New text alterations,
replacing the word
‘Yahweh’ with ‘the LORD’
as requested by Benedict
XVI for all new Bibles

 New directories of
references for readings
used in the Mass and the
Liturgy of the Hours,
including the fuller
two-year cycle for
the Breviary.

___________

A Note on Translations

• 1965 translation of the
Jerusalem Bible (used in the
readings at Mass)

• Grail translation of the Psalms (used for the responsorial psalm in the Mass and also in the
breviary or ‘Divine Office’).

• God’s name (‘Yahweh’ in the original Jerusalem Translation) is replaced throughout by ‘the LORD’ just as it is in the readings for Mass and in accordance with recent instructions from the Pontifical Biblical Commission.
___________

Summary of Key Features

Notes and introductions by Dom Henry Wansbrough OSB, eminent biblical scholar and member of the Pontifical Biblical Commission

Liturgical introductions by Dom James Leachman OSB of the Pontifical Institute of Liturgy

• The first Catholic Bible that brings together the exact
English texts as read in the Mass

• Reference tables for Scripture readings of the Church’s year

- Mass readings for both Sundays and Weekdays

- Liturgy of the Hours (‘Breviary’ or ‘Divine Office’):

full listing of the Psalms and Canticles of the 4-week cycle

• Index showing where passages from the Bible are read during the liturgical year

• Explanation of the Cycles of Readings and Liturgy of the Hours

• Full Directory of Office of Readings for 1- and 2-year cycles

• Explanation of the centrality of Scripture in the life of the
Church, summarising Dei Verbum

• Two introductions to each book of the Bible:

- Historical context and authorship
- Use of the book in the Catholic liturgy and the Church’s year

• new footnotes using the most up-to-date scholarship;
marginal references; Imprimatur, to guarantee the notes are
in conformity with Catholic teaching

• Timeline of the main events in Biblical history

• 4 Bible Maps, including New and Old Testament Palestine,
and the Journeys of St Paul, plus index of main places mentioned

• Index of Biblical themes with Glossary

Affordable pricing

Thanks to the generous support of our Members and donors,
CTS always publishes at prices affordable to all.
(CTS is a registered charity no. 218951)

November 14, 2007 9:50 PM  
Blogger Ray from MN said...

Thank you very much, Vincenzo.

That was a lot of work to do that.

It was helpful, though.


Ray

November 15, 2007 6:41 AM  

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